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Imperativism and Pain Intensity

Several authors have suggested that degrees of pain are problematic for imperativists about pain. We present a satisfying and well-motivated model of imperative urgency that also applies to pains, and which sheds light on some curious phenomena of …

Teleosemantics and Indeterminacy

In the first part of the paper, I present a framework for the description and evaluation of teleosemantic theories of intentionality, and use it to argue that several different objections to these theories (the various indeterminacy and adequacy …

Ideal Negative Conceivability and the Halting Problem

Our limited a priori-reasoning skills open a gap between our finding a proposition conceivable and its metaphysical possibility. A prominent strategy for closing this gap is the postulation of ideal conceivers, who suffer from no such limitations. In …

Teleosemantics and Productivity

There has been much discussion of so-called teleosemantic approaches to the naturalization of content. Such discussion, though, has been largely confined to simple, innate mental states with contents such as “There is a fly here.” Even assuming we …

Imperative Content and the Painfulness of Pain

Representationalist theories of phenomenal consciousness have problems in accounting for pain, for at least two reasons. First of all, the negative affective phenomenology of pain (its painfulness) does not seem to be representational at all. …

Traveling in Branching Time

Miller (2005) and Miller (2008) argue that the branching picture of time is incompatible with the possibility of backwards time travel. In this paper I show that Miller's conclusion is based on a hidden as- sumption which, while generally plausible, …